Blowing Up These Sparks For Their Meagre Heat

Seamus Heaney at a turf bog in Bellaghy wearing his father’s coat, hat and walking stick and additional shots in the Bellaghy bog, 1986. Photo: Bobbie Hanvey (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

Walking home from beers in the park with a friend today, I listened through Seamus Heaney’s Nobel Prize Lecture from when he became a laureate in 1995 (you can read it here, but he does have a wonderful voice, so it’s worth hearing him read it).

It’s actually a quite wonderful speech. He has that ridiculous precision with words, even in the smallest turn of phrase. Listen for when he describes his childhood as “creaturely” (imagine the conceptual difference between that word in that place and, say, “animal” or “beastly”), or when he refers to “the dolorous circumstances of my native place”.

The theme is Crediting Poetry, trying to carve out a place for what poetry is, what it can be:

I credit it ultimately because poetry can make an order as true to the impact of external reality and as sensitive to the inner laws of the poet’s being as the ripples that rippled in and rippled out across the water in that scullery bucket fifty years ago. An order where we can at last grow up to that which we stored up as we grew. An order which satisfies all that is appetitive in the intelligence and prehensile in the affections. I credit poetry, in other words, both for being itself and for being a help, for making possible a fluid and restorative relationship between the mind’s centre and its circumference, between the child gazing at the word “Stockholm” on the face of the radio dial and the man facing the faces that he meets in Stockholm at this most privileged moment. I credit it because credit is due to it, in our time and in all time, for its truth to life, in every sense of that phrase.

His speech becomes more tender and raw when he ventures into the conflict in Northern Ireland which coloured his life. He tells this heart-stopping story, which I’m going to indulge and quote at length, for the way it gestures towards redemption:

One of the most harrowing moments in the whole history of the harrowing of the heart in Northern Ireland came when a minibus full of workers being driven home one January evening in 1976 was held up by armed and masked men and the occupants of the van ordered at gunpoint to line up at the side of the road. Then one of the masked executioners said to them, “Any Catholics among you, step out here”. As it happened, this particular group, with one exception, were all Protestants, so the presumption must have been that the masked men were Protestant paramilitaries about to carry out a tit-for-tat sectarian killing of the Catholic as the odd man out, the one who would have been presumed to be in sympathy with the IRA and all its actions. It was a terrible moment for him, caught between dread and witness, but he did make a motion to step forward. Then, the story goes, in that split second of decision, and in the relative cover of the winter evening darkness, he felt the hand of the Protestant worker next to him take his hand and squeeze it in a signal that said no, don’t move, we’ll not betray you, nobody need know what faith or party you belong to. All in vain, however, for the man stepped out of the line; but instead of finding a gun at his temple, he was thrown backward and away as the gunmen opened fire on those remaining in the line, for these were not Protestant terrorists, but members, presumably, of the Provisional IRA.

*

It is difficult at times to repress the thought that history is about as instructive as an abattoir; that Tacitus was right and that peace is merely the desolation left behind after the decisive operations of merciless power. I remember, for example, shocking myself with a thought I had about that friend who was imprisoned in the seventies upon suspicion of having been involved with a political murder: I shocked myself by thinking that even if he were guilty, he might still perhaps be helping the future to be born, breaking the repressive forms and liberating new potential in the only way that worked, that is to say the violent way – which therefore became, by extension, the right way. It was like a moment of exposure to interstellar cold, a reminder of the scary element, both inner and outer, in which human beings must envisage and conduct their lives. But it was only a moment. The birth of the future we desire is surely in the contraction which that terrified Catholic felt on the roadside when another hand gripped his hand, not in the gunfire that followed, so absolute and so desolate, if also so much a part of the music of what happens.

As writers and readers, as sinners and citizens, our realism and our aesthetic sense make us wary of crediting the positive note. The very gunfire braces us and the atrocious confers a worth upon the effort which it calls forth to confront it. We are rightly in awe of the torsions in the poetry of Paul Celan and rightly enamoured of the suspiring voice in Samuel Beckett because these are evidence that art can rise to the occasion and somehow be the corollary of Celan’s stricken destiny as Holocaust survivor and Beckett’s demure heroism as a member of the French Resistance. Likewise, we are rightly suspicious of that which gives too much consolation in these circumstances; the very extremity of our late twentieth century knowledge puts much of our cultural heritage to an extreme test. Only the very stupid or the very deprived can any longer help knowing that the documents of civilization have been written in blood and tears, blood and tears no less real for being very remote. And when this intellectual predisposition co-exists with the actualities of Ulster and Israel and Bosnia and Rwanda and a host of other wounded spots on the face of the earth, the inclination is not only not to credit human nature with much constructive potential but not to credit anything too positive in the work of art.

I was very happy when I learned that his last words, texted to his wife from the hospital bed — in latin, for Christ’s sake — were noli timere, “don’t be afraid.”

I was walking through the park while I listened to Heaney’s lecture. And just as he said how St Kevin stood “at the intersection of natural process and the glimpsed ideal, at one and the same time a signpost and a reminder”, I passed a stand of flowers. I had just about given up hope for flowers this late in the season, with the first leaves falling already, but there they were, perfumed to the fingertips, flooding me with . For a second it seemed as if that line of Heaney’s about poetry being “equal to and true at the same time” was true, real, present like the old man himself, speaking those words. But he’s already dead and all we can do now is read him.

*

His Nobel lecture also quotes his poem “Exposure” at length, the last poem from the wonderful collection North. I’ll quote the whole thing here for you, he only quotes from the third stanza onwards.

It is December in Wicklow:
Alders dripping, birches
Inheriting the last light,
The ash tree cold to look at.

A comet that was lost
Should be visible at sunset,
Those million tons of light
Like a glimmer of haws and rose-hips,

And I sometimes see a falling star.
If I could come on meteorite!
Instead I walk through damp leaves,
Husks, the spent flukes of autumn,

Imagining a hero
On some muddy compound,
His gift like a slingstone
Whirled for the desperate.

How did I end up like this?
I often think of my friends’
Beautiful prismatic counselling
And the anvil brains of some who hate me

As I sit weighing and weighing
My responsible tristia.
For what? For the ear? For the people?
For what is said behind-backs?

Rain comes down through the alders,
Its low conductive voices
Mutter about let-downs and erosions
And yet each drop recalls

The diamond absolutes.
I am neither internee nor informer;
An inner émigré, grown long-haired
And thoughtful; a wood-kerne

Escaped from the massacre,
Taking protective colouring
From bole and bark, feeling
Every wind that blows;

Who, blowing up these sparks
For their meagre heat, have missed
The once-in-a-lifetime portent,
The comet’s pulsing rose.

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3 comments
  1. Mike said:

    Fine homage – eloquent and apt.

  2. Release said:

    Thank you, Mike. That’s very kind of you! Were you also a reader of mr. Heaney?

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